How do I turn down an inheritance?

My mother is 92 and her Will states that her estate is to be divided equally among her 3 children (myself and my 2 brothers). My dad passed away 4 years ago. Due to infighting and discord between my 2 brothers, the oldest is named as executor in the Will. I want to bow out of all of the fighting that is taking place now and will certainly continue after her death. How or what do I sign and present now to waive my rights to any inheritance in the future and excuse myself from all of the drama that is being played out? My mother refuses to take me out of her Will.

Asked on September 18, 2012 under Estate Planning, Nebraska

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

The way to "bow out" of any inheritance that one may receive under a Will, trust or intestacy proceeding is after the person who gave the "gift" dies, sign a document disclaiming all rights to inherit under the estate where the gift was given and file such in the probate or intestacy matter or provide such to the trustee.

You cannot waive any rights to inherit while your mother is alive based upon the facts of your question.


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