What can I do if my landlord seems to want to send people over for repairs, pest control or other issues without notifying me first?

The issue today was I was at work and he sent a pest control company over to spray the inside of the house. My daughter who is 16 was home alone at the time and would not let the person in because I had not told her they were coming. My landlord then called me at work basically yelling at me that my daughter would not let in the pest control people and when I told him that he needed to reschedule he told me that the new locking bedroom door knobs that I put on mine and my daughter’s bedroom doors are against the lease and that he will be sending me paperwork Monday to terminate my lease. I will be receiving an eviction notice.

Asked on October 30, 2015 under Real Estate Law, Texas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

The landlord must provide reasonable notice (typically 24 hours or more) for non-emergency repairs, maintenance, kr extermination (no notice is required in emergencies); you should not be evicted when the landlord failed to provide notice, and if he seeks to evict you for this reason, you wpuld raise lack of notice as a defense.
If the door knobs are against the lease, you are in violation of the lease and could be evicted for that reasons, though generally, if you "cure" the problem by removing the knobs before court, you should be ok.


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