If my landlord put a notice that a cable company was going to rewire all the apartments in the complex, can I refuse them entry to my apartment?

The company that is going to do the rewire is a company I don’t do business with. I use another cable tv provider. My apartment is already rewired for fast internet connection. The notice states that we need to move our furniture prior to the techs arrival. They did say that we will be given 24 hour notice prior to the techs arrival. I feel this is of no benefit to me and a great inconvenience. Do I have any rights to refuse this?

Asked on September 5, 2011 under Real Estate Law, South Carolina

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Under the laws of all states a landlord is entitled to access to a rented unit upon reasonable notice for repairs, maintenance and other allowable reasons for access. Twenty-four (24) hours minimum is ordinarily deemed reasonable notice.

Your landlord owns the unit you are living in. If he or she wants to rewire all of the units in his complex to benefit the tenants as a whole, the landlord may do so even though the new wiring will have a service provider that you do not use. You are presently using another provider for your cable and television. I see no reason why you cannot continue using the same provider. The new wiring would allow other tenants in your complex another option for internet and cable providers.

You have no legal or factual basis to prevent your landlord access for new wiring installation at your rented unit from what you have written.


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