How can I legally get my husband to take care of us financially?

My husband has left his family and moved in with his new girlfriend. He willingly gives me $1800 per month but my rent alone is $1200. We have 2 children and 1 is autistic. He is not letting me keep our van. He says I have to get my own vehicle. I haven’t had to work for over 12 years. I have no money and he doesn’t want to pay anymore though he can afford it. He doesn’t want to get a divorce because he knows he will have to pay much more money. Where can I go and what can I do?

Asked on September 8, 2012 under Family Law, Colorado

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

It is my understanding that the Judges and the Courts in the state of Colorado try and look to maintain the lifestyle afforded the children during the marriage in a divorce.  Your husband's contribution is set by state law.  He can not just decide what he will pay.  I am giving you a link to the child support worksheets.  The fact that you have one child that is under a disbility will mean that your support for that child may indeed go longer than 18 or the legal age limit there. I am making this sound a little less complex thanh it really may be so I would consider speaking with an attorney as soon as you can to get temporary orders in to place.  If you can not afford a private attorney try legal aid or your local bar association or law school clinic.  Good luck.

http://www.courts.state.co.us/Forms/Forms_List.cfm?Form_Type_ID=94


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