What is the fastest route to bring my fiancé to the US if we want to marry but she lives in China?

We lived together for nearly a year and decided to marry. I recently returned to America while she still resides in China. We would like to be married and for her to move to America sometime next year for immigration. I’m open to marrying in China and coming here, getting married here or anything else.

Asked on October 29, 2014 under Immigration Law, Michigan

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 6 years ago | Contributor

According to USCIS:

If you petition for a fiancé(e) visa, you must show that:

  • You (the petitioner) are a U.S. citizen.
  • You intend to marry within 90 days of your fiancé(e) entering the United States.
  • You and your fiancé(e) are both free to marry and any previous marriages must have been legally terminated by divorce, death, or annulment.
  • You met each other, in person, at least once within 2 years of filing your petition. There are two exceptions that require a waiver:
    1. If the requirement to meet would violate strict and long-established customs of your or your fiancé(e)’s foreign culture or social practice.
    2. If you prove that the requirement to meet would result in extreme hardship to you.

Here is a link to the page.  Good luck.

http://www.uscis.gov/family/family-us-citizens/fiancee-visa/fiancee-visas


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