My Father did his own will and left ‘everything’ to me and my cousin. Who gets what?

My Father did his will on LegalZoom. He did several revisions because he kept
giving things to different people. He tried to give his main asset, his property, to
my cousin and my cousin refused it. My Father and I were arguing at the time so I
was ‘cut out of the Will’. Shortly before his passing, he changed it again and
added me back in to get 100 of his estate. He also bequeathed the property and
all that he owns to my cousin who previously said no.

My cousin is now the executer of the estate. I’m the only heir. My cousin’s lawyer
says that he gets everything but the will is very confusing, especially because you
can see all the revisions. It looks like my Father simply didn’t remove my cousin
from his last revision but he did leave ‘everything’ to two people.

Who gets what?

Asked on January 19, 2018 under Estate Planning, Massachusetts

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

You need to file an objection to the Will being submitted for Porbate and to have the Will disregarded and to proceed as if your Father died "intestate" - without a WIll.  The you would inherit everything.  Call your local Bar Association and see if they ahve an attorney referral service.  Let them know you need a good probate attorney that does trials on Wills in Probate Court.  You have going to have to pay out of pocket for this.  Hurry.  Good luck.


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