What to do if my ex keeps asking me for alimony money early but I pay her the day I get paid?

If I don’t pay her, she threatens me. Is there a third party I can pay, like the court or some other official, where I can give them the money and I don’t have to deal with being harassed or threatened?

Asked on September 2, 2015 under Family Law, Connecticut

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

You have to pay when the divorce decree or settlement indicates you must pay she is within her rights to complain and even take legal action if you fail to do so. On the other hand, if you are complying with the schedule, you have no obligation to pay her early you have to do what the order and/or decree say, but no more. If she is harassing you, you could try bringing a complaint filing a legal action against her for harassment, asking for a court order that she cannot contract you for payment before the due date.
Alternately, if you are not paying according to the schedule in the order or decree, you can file a motion in this case with court to ask the court to revise the payment schedule in line with when you are paid while it is not guaranteed that the court will, if you provide evidence of when you are paid and that you have been paying alimony as soon as you can, there is a reasonable chance the court will modify the schedule to be more realistic.


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