My employer has called me to tell me that my payroll check was cashed twice.

I work at a local fast food place. We have the ability to monitor our current and previous payments from payroll

online but receive those payments via paper check only and we get paid every 2 weeks.I received my paycheck today and cashed it normally. I then received a call from my boss saying that my check from last month 05/22 was cashed twice and that I had better figure out why and how because its a felony. Thing is, there are only 5 places to cash a check here and they all take the check from you after you cash it. One of those is Cross Cut liqueur. I cashed my check there and until today 6/5 had no knowledge of anything amiss.

Asked on June 5, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Missouri

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

If you participated in the double-cashing, it was a crime, and also something you could be sued over (e.g. by the employer, to get the money back). If the double cashing did not have your participation, but occured because you were careless with the check (left it someplace you should not, or gave it to someone whom there was reason to think was untrustworthy), you would not have committed a crime, but still could owe the money back due to your negligence.
If it occured without your participation and despite you acting reasonably in regards to the check, then you are in no way liable or responsible.  
Therefore, since what the facts and circumstances look like will determine if you may face criminal and/or civil liability, it makes sense for you to try to figure out and document what happened, to protect yourself in case the employer tries to blame it on you.


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