What are my rights if my employer has been making my work environment very stressful?

My employer overreacts when problems occur and my job is always being questioned. I have produced outstanding results in marketing and in advertising. Many of my clients enjoy working with me, and my production is up. However, there was a minor miscommunication that was brought to my attention. And even though this minor situation did not pertain to me, now I had a phone call from my employer that my job could be at stake. The protocol has never been my responsibility nor addressed to me in the past. Now all of a sudden, my work stay here is very stressful I feel excluded from my team, and my job is always being questioned. I have produced great numbers and zero complaints.

Asked on September 25, 2015 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

Before continuing to escalate this i.e. taking it to the Director of HR, consider this you have no rights in this, unless and only if
1 you have a written employment contract which sets out disciplinary proceedures which must be followed or limits the grounds for discipline or
2 your employer is doing this because it is discriminating against you because of a protected characteristic that is, it is discriminating against you or harassing you because of your race, sex, religion, age over 40, disability, etc.
Other than the above, employers may make the jobs as stressful as they want may exclude employees from decision making, teams, or comaraderie can question an employee at every term can harass an employee can fail to reward good employees etc. That's because there is no employment contract, you are an employee at will and have no right in or to your job so if the employer is not engaging in one of the few types of specifically prohibited discrimination, they can treat employees however they like.
So bear in mind that if you keep bringing this up, your employer could decide you are not a team player or are more trouble than you're worth and fire you. You may be best off simply starting to quietly look for another job.


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