If my dad is an alcoholic is my mom legally liable for him?

My dad has struggled with depression and alcoholism for quite some time.

He tends to do things on his own terms and won’t admit he has a problem.

His family doesn’t really want anything to do with him and won’t bring him to

his senses. Now my mom is concerned because recently he has been

drinking more than usual. He’s not eating or bathing and won’t stop drinking. Should we be calling someone? She has considered divorce but has been hesitant because of the social shaming in the community.

Asked on August 27, 2016 under Family Law, Oklahoma

Answers:

S.L,. Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

If your dad is at fault in an auto accident driving a vehicle for which your mom is the registered owner, she is liable. Liability would include property damage to the other vehicle and the personal injury claims of each occupant of the vehicle not at fault. Each personal injury claim would include liability for the medical bills, pain and suffering, an amount in addition to the medical bills and wage loss.
Same facts, but your dad is driving a vehicle not registered to your mom, if the case is not settled with your parents' insurance carrier, a lawsuit filed against your parents could result in a lien against their home.
If your dad is not in an auto accident, but injures someone or damages property while drunk, mom could be liable for negligent supervision. These are only a few of numerous possibilities where mom could be liable .
As for intervention, call AA for your dad.
 
 


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