if my dad had me sign papers about my grandfather’s Will as a minor and I wasn’t aware of what I signed until recent;y, can anything be done now?

I was around 15 when my grandfather passed away. It was when he passed that my stepgrandmother proved she married him for his money. I am now 26 and am finding out things that I wasn’t aware of when my dad had me sign papers at the age of 15. Apparently, I signed papers saying that I had no interest in my grandfather’s Trust. I am finding out now that my father and his 2 brothers made a deal with my stepgrandmother for a chunk of money now (11 years ago) for trade of all the interest in the Trust. Therefore, they made all of the grandchildren sign papers to release it to her. It hasn’t been talked about in years but my cousin, sister and I discussed it today and I found out that because I signed those papers I will never have my share of my Grandfather’s business that he would have wanted me to have, all his grandkids for that matter. So even though I had no idea what I was signing at 15 when it was signed, would there be anything I could do about it?

Asked on May 29, 2012 under Estate Planning, Arkansas

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Under the laws of all states in this country a minor, (person under the age of 18 years of age) cannot legally contract with another person with respect to any matter. This would include the "release" that you have written about.

From what you have written, your release seemingly would be invalid concerning your grandfather's estate. There might be an issue concerning statute of limitations concerning your matter. I suggest that you immediately consult a Wills and trust attorney about the situation you are writing about sooner rather than later.


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