Landlord tenant law and grievances. Is it possible to go further than filing a grievance when the landlord is at fault for causing damages?

I am disputing that I left water on in my apartment while I went to work. The landlord said that the tub overflowed and that I left the water on this is not true because I was at work all day and nobody was home to use the water, my ex-husband can be a witness to this. They admitted to working on water pressure and boot marks were left in my tub. I had made numerous service requests about the plumbing in the bathroom, and that it had been an ongoing problem and these problems led up to the fact that even though I turned faucets off the washer was loose and water still flowed full blast.

Asked on June 11, 2009 under Real Estate Law, Ohio

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

This sounds like it wasn't the least bit your fault, although I don't have all of the facts.  And if it isn't your fault, you shouldn't have to pay for it. I'm not an Ohio lawyer, but while there are variations in the law from one state to another, this is fairly basic.

The procedure for what to do next does differ from one state to another, and the fact that you mention a "grievance" suggests that there may be a grievance procedure in your lease.

So, for reliable advice, about what to do next, you should talk to an attorney, have her or him review the lease and all of the facts.  One place to find a lawyer in your area is our website, http://attorneypages.com


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