Isn’t it the job of the buyer’s agent to present offers but not to tell you what to bid on a house?

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Isn’t it the job of the buyer’s agent to present offers but not to tell you what to bid on a house?

The house was listed for 370k. The seller’s agent presented them with 2 offers. Our 365k, no contingencies. The other buyer 370k but their offer was contingent on selling their own home. Then 1.5 months passed and I got a text from the sellers agent if I was still interested in the house, as the contingent offer had credit issues and would have taken another few months to sort out. I wanted to offer 365k again, or something less than asking, given the circumstances of an even more motivated seller. It was at this point that the seller’s agent, who I had been communicating with via text, said

Asked on July 27, 2017 under Real Estate Law, Michigan

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

No, there is nothing wrong with the agent, whose job is to represent the sellers, telling you that for your offer to be reconsidered, it would have to be $370k, if that was based on instructions, feedback, etc. from his clients. If you evidence that it was NOT based on his client's directions or instructions, then this may have been a breach of his professional and ethical obligations and you could file a complaint with the realtor licensing board. But remember: there is no inherent right to have your offer considered, so as long as the seller had indicated that they would only consider asking-price offers, there was nothing illegal or unethical done.


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