is there redress for FALSE harassment complaints?

a co-worker has made (2) official serious accusations of harrassment against me in less than 1 year. both complaints were seriously and thoroughly investigated and found to be FALSE, and completely unfounded. i have not felt negatively impacted, but do fear continued false, and perhaps accelerating accusations could be damaging. i completely feel there should be disciplinary action attached to this, as it has now become harrassment for ME!

Asked on May 22, 2009 under Employment Labor Law, South Carolina

Answers:

J.V., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

If this behavior seems to be repetitive and you feel you are now being harassed the first step should be to go through the same motions the individual making the complaints against you did. Whatever system your place of employment has for reporting issues of harassment should be visited.

If the employer cannot do anything you can always contact a local employment attorney and explain the situation. However prior to making this step you may want to wait to see if in fact your predictions of continued accusations does occur. Whether there will be a valid cause of action will largely depend on whether there is an effect (i.e. you have suffered x injury as a result of the accusations)

First attempt to remedy this problem in house if not possible attempt to have a consultation with an attorney to review any options you may have


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