Is there a way to obtain a property leagaly by by-passing the owners?

My family and I moved into a house several years ago and enjoyed living there but moved to a place closer to town. Now that I have moved out from my parents house I would like to look at buying the property. I have tried several times to contact the owners, but they have not given me any answer at all. The property was vacant 7 years before we moved in and has been vacant since we moved out 4 or 5 years ago now. The out-buildings 2 Barns and the house have become in such disrepair that they would have to sell it for the land alone about 10 to 12 acers. Is there a way to by-pass the owners to own the property? Or would I still have to go through them?

Asked on April 30, 2017 under Real Estate Law, Nebraska

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

It is their property, even if they are not making good use of it, are not being responsive about it, etc. There is no way to "bypass" the owners and take their property, even if they are neglecting it and any logical person *should* sell it to you. It'd be the same if you had a classic Mustang that you were letting rust away in your driveway and had no intention of driving: someone else, who wanted to restore and treasure it, could not take your car from you or even force you to negotiate over it if you did not want to--it's yours to do with as you wish. Similarly, these owners have the right to own and yet neglect their property, and don't have to respond to queries about it.


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