Is there a Will form that I can print that is legal?

If so, what is the website?

Asked on September 22, 2017 under Estate Planning, Texas

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

There are many on-line companies that offer state specific Will forms. You can ggogle for them; many also have reviews which you may find t be helpful. Additionlly, in TX, a "holographic" Will is legal. This is a handwritten Will. In order to be valid it must be completely in the handwriting of the testator (i.e. the person making the Will) and signed by them. Such a Will can be written on anything and does not have to be signed by witnesses. However, it is still necessary for the testator to have mental capacity and intent at the time it is executed. However, since many people do not know the requirements for a valid Will, such a Will may contain defects which lead to unnecessary expenses and delays in administering their estate. So, for example, if it has ambiguous terms, it might be necessary for a court to determine their meaning, etc. In order to be certain that your este is administered the way that you want, you really should do a more formal Will and get the forms.

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

There are many on-line companies that offer state specific Will forms. You can ggogle for them; many also have reviews which you may find t be helpful. Additionlly, in TX, a "holographic" Will is legal. This is a handwritten Will. In order to be valid it must be completely in the handwriting of the testator (i.e. the person making the Will) and signed by them. Such a Will can be written on anything and does not have to be signed by witnesses. However, it is still necessary for the testator to have mental capacity and intent at the time it is executed. However, since many people do not know the requirements for a valid Will, such a Will may contain defects which lead to unnecessary expenses and delays in administering their estate. So, for example, if it has ambiguous terms, it might be necessary for a court to determine their meaning, etc. In order to be certain that your este is administered the way that you want, you really should do a more formal Will and get the forms.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.