Is my employer allowed to ask me to pretend to be her husband on the phone in order for her to recieve a credit card?

I work in the dental field in an office of 14, including the 2 men (the doctors). I was asked on 2 separate occasions by one of the doctor’s wives, who is the office manger, to give me her best

man voice. The first time I was new and I made a rash decision and did what she asked but I could not help but feel insulted. I am the only lesbian in the office of straight staff and I was the only women asked to participate in the ridiculous scandal. Do I have any rights? I have recently changed jobs due to this and a few other reasons concerning OSHA and the state board of dental examiners with this particular office. Also, when turning in my 2 weeks notice, 3 weeks ago, I worked only 1 day before they told me I was no longer needed.

Asked on June 23, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, Texas

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

No, it is not legal to pretend to be someone else in order to help anyone get a credit card.  In fact, it is considered credit card fraud, a form of identity theft. 
It is also illegal for your employer to discriminate against you or subject you to a hostile work environment because of your sexual orientation.  This may be an discrimination claim or an OSHA claim for hostile work environment.
You really need to set up consults with two different types of attorneys.  The first should be a criminal attorney to discuss how best to handle your criminal involvement in this matter.  The second attorney should be a civil rights attorney or employment law attorney to discuss how you are being treated at work and what you are being asked to do. 


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