Is it possible to have a divorce in Texas without paying legal fees?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Is it possible to have a divorce in Texas without paying legal fees?

I cannot afford a lawyer, I have been a stay at home mom for 13 years and have zero income. I filed for divorce in Travis countyhe lived in Florida but my spouse is doing everything in his power to have it delayed and it disguising his assets and income falsely filing bankruptcy so that I get nothing. Besides the obvious of alerting authorities of his financial situation lies, is there anything I can do to be officially divorced and have child and or spousal support? Obviously child support is priority but we are a high income family and when on good terms we had discussed spousal support for the initial period after divorce. Any advice is appreciated.

Asked on August 8, 2016 under Real Estate Law, Texas

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

As a general rule, it's hard to escape a contested divorce without some legal fees or filing fee expenses.  However, the fact that you are in a larger county means there are actually more resources available to you. You need to contact the president of the local bar association and the clerk of the court to see if they have a list of pro bono or legal aid organizations to assist you.  Most larger counties sponsor clinics where individuals that are going through divorce can have their documents reviewed for any suggestions, including how to get your case finalized with a decree of divorce. 
If your husband is currently hiding assets, I would not recommend finalizing your divorce until each of you have completed sworn inventory and appraisements.  This is basically where each party swears as to what the assets are. From there, the court will have a better idea of what the assets are and how to divide them to provide for an equitable division of assets.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption