Is it legal to work over 6 weeks with no pay?

I started a new job and my employer just informed me there is a six week hold back is this legal? I started 06/09 but won’t receive a check until 07/15 0r 07/30.

Asked on June 15, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Arkansas

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Federal and state laws require that an employer pay its employees regularly. in other words, at regular intervals. A business cannot pay employees monthly one month and weekly the next. The number of pay periods (i.e. a company's frequency of paying its workers) is not regulated by the IRS. Some states do impose minimum payment frequencies, while others do not. To check the specific law in your area you can contact your state's department of labor.









You cannot pay employees monthly one month and weekly the next. The number of pay periods (the frequency of paying employees) is not regulated by the IRS. Some states do impose minimum payment frequencies. For example, Utah, Ohio, and Massachusetts have minimum pay frequency.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Under the laws of your state (and of every state with which I am familiar), employees must be paid at least semi-monthly (two checks per month), though a reasonable and legal alternative is to pay biweekly (every two weeks, which works out to 26 checks per year, rather than the 24 you get with semimonthly payment). It is therefore not legal to hold you pay this long; you should contact your state department of labor to file a complaint.


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