Is it legal for employers not to give access to paystub information?

My wife was not given access to any information on pay at any time even after asking the office manager. They kept beating around the bush and simply ignored her. She was employed at that company for about 1 1/2 years and never say an actual paper pay stub or electronic pay stub. She was getting paid via direct deposit.

Asked on June 6, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

CA law requires 10 specific pieces of information must be included on every payroll paystub or wage statement. The stub/statement must be itemized and must be electronic or in writing and contain:

Gross wages earned, 
Total hours worked by the employee, except for a slary based employee who is exempt from overtime.
All deductions; 
All net wages earned;
The dates of the period for which the employee was paid; 
The name of the employee and the last 4 digits of their SSN or EIN;
The legal name and address of the the employer;
All hourly rates in effect during the pay period and the corresponding number of hours worked at each rate by the employee;
The amount of accrued paid sick leave; and
If applicable, the number of piece-rate units earned and any piece rate if the employee is paid on a piece-rate basis.

This information must be presented to the employee with each wage payment so that the employee can “promptly and easily” find the above information. If the employer offers its employees the ability to be paid by direct deposit, the employer must offer the employee the option of receiving their paystubs/wage statements in either paper or electronic form. 
Failure to comply with the requirements of the labor code is a misdemeanor and carries a civil penalty of $50 for the first violation, and $100 per pay period for each subsequent violation up to a total of $4,000 per employee. 


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