Is it legal for a manger to drastically cut your hours because you hurt his feelings?

I complained to my manager about my general manager and he overheard me and got his feelings hurt. I only stated the facts and did not say anything personal or bad. He has now cut my hours from 40+ hours a week to 16 hours a week. Last schedule I was scheduled for 5 days at 40 hours for the week and this schedule I am only scheduled for 3 days. One day is a full 8 hour shift and the other 2 days are only 4 hour shifts. The schedule only has me working on days he is either off or not in the store. I have been there 4 years and have worked 40+ hours a week the entire time.

Asked on May 20, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, Ohio

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

You need to immediately present this matter to the General Manager's boss and indicate that this a violation of your rights as an employee. Put everything in writing to protect yourself because be certain that your manager is not going to go to bat for you if it means she or he could lose her or his job. Talk to the district manager or regional manager and see if that could help. You may wish to explore your concerns through the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and your own state's Department of Labor. Keep at it and start looking for a position elsewhere in case this turns into an ugly harassment or hostile work condition case.


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