Is a work contract still in effect after the end date if no new contract is signed?

I’m a deputy from a medium size department in Washington state. Our contract ended in December of 2006 and we have been in negotiations since then. One of the statements our Sheriff has made is that since we (the deputies) do not have a current contract, he does not have to abide by any contract. Because of this he is now making changes on issues that have always been voted on in the past, e.i. uniform allowance, schedule changes, light duty… I believe there is case law stating he must abide by the last contract but I don’t know where to look.

Asked on July 3, 2009 under Employment Labor Law, Washington

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

Your negotiating unit needs a good labor lawyer.  The questions you have are complicated ones, especially for a law enforcement agency, and anyone would need to get into the detailed facts to give you reliable advice.

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

Your negotiating unit needs a good labor lawyer.  The questions you have are complicated ones, especially for a law enforcement agency, and anyone would need to get into the detailed facts to give you reliable advice.


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