Is $532 shoplifting case a petit larceny or a grand larceny?

If I get a job and do community services and / or petit larceny class before the court date will that help? How can I still go to college and have a future either than jail or prision

Asked on September 17, 2013 under Criminal Law, Nevada

Answers:

Tricia Dwyer / Tricia Dwyer Esq & Associates PLLC

Answered 7 years ago | Contributor

Hello. You should consider your legal issues to be quite serious and you should seek help from an attorney licensed in your state (I myself am licensed in Minnesota.) In a situation such as you describe, I myself would typically advise the person to take multiple proactive action steps right away. Some attorneys are available seven days for emergency legal needs. Many attorneys will speak initially at no charge. Then, if legal work is performed, some attorneys will provide a reduced fee for financial hardship. Some attorneys may also assist you in a limited scope manner to conserve legal costs. All the best.

 

TRICIA DWYER, ESQ.

Tricia Dwyer, Esq & Associates PLLC

Phone: 612-296-9666

365 Days of the Year until 8 p.m. daily

dwyer.tricia@gmail.com

http://dwyerlawfirm.net

CRIMINAL LAW

THEFT LAW

PROBATION VIOLATION LAW

Maury Beaulier / MinnesotaLawyers.com

Answered 7 years ago | Contributor

A theft offense can be very serious.  In Minnesota, any theft under $500 is a misdemeanor and a theft over $500 but less than 41000 is a gross midemeanor.  A misdemeanor  is punishable by up to 90 days in jail and a $1000 fine.  A gross misdemeanor is punishable by up to one year in jail and a $3000 fine. The collateral consequences of a conviction can also be extremely significant and preclude a person from finding employment where background checks are performed. 
 
Often, if you have no prior offenses, a conviction can be avoided with a Stay of Prosecution.  A Stay of Prosecution means that the offense is never recorded on your record and stayed for a certain periofd of time to ensure that you do not have another offense.  
 
We can assist you in making sure that your record is not affected. 
 
For a FREE consultation call 612.240.8005.


Maury D. Beaulier

Attorney at Law

(612) 240-8005

maury@beaulier.com

Maury Beaulier / MinnesotaLawyers.com

Answered 7 years ago | Contributor

A theft offense can be very serious.  In Minnesota, any theft under $500 is a misdemeanor and a theft over $500 but less than 41000 is a gross midemeanor.  A misdemeanor  is punishable by up to 90 days in jail and a $1000 fine.  A gross misdemeanor is punishable by up to one year in jail and a $3000 fine. The collateral consequences of a conviction can also be extremely significant and preclude a person from finding employment where background checks are performed. 
 
Often, if you have no prior offenses, a conviction can be avoided with a Stay of Prosecution.  A Stay of Prosecution means that the offense is never recorded on your record and stayed for a certain periofd of time to ensure that you do not have another offense.  
 
We can assist you in making sure that your record is not affected. 
 
For a FREE consultation call 612.240.8005.


Maury D. Beaulier

Attorney at Law

(612) 240-8005

maury@beaulier.com


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