Insurance information

My truck was struck by a school bus while it was parked on the street by my house. The school says it will take care of it. What I want to know is what information do I have to give them. They want my insurance information. I feel as if it is none of their business. The bus hit my truck so they are liable to pay for it at all costs. What do they want my insurance information for. I do not like giving out any of my personal information to anyone. Do I have to do this?

Asked on December 17, 2017 under Accident Law, Washington

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

First, they are no liable to pay until and unless you sue them and win, getting a court judgment (order) in your favor. The court judgment creates the obligation to pay. Any payment made by them or their insurer prior to that or without you suing is voluntary, so if you don't provide them the information they want, they simply will not offer to pay anything, and you will have to sue. If you are ok with doing that, you can go ahead and file your lawsuit, but if you want a resolution without suing, you have to work with them and cooperate. (Cooperating does not guaranty they will settle the case without a lawsuit, but it hugely increases the chance.)
Second, based on what you write, yes, the would (if sued) most likely be 100% liable. But their insurer will do its own investigation to   determine that (again, unless you choose to simply sue) and will want to talk to the other insurer to see if there is any chance your insurer will pick up part of the cost. Again, if you want the schoo's insurer to work with you, you have to work with them.


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