Can I legally put my errand business fliers on peoples cars under there windshield wipers at businesses?

Do I have to have the businesses permission before adding the fliers to car windshields? I haven’t started the business yet or have I been paid for errands. I’m in the pre-stage for my errand business. Also, can I do the errand business without registering and paying for a local business fee. I plan on getting one later when my business is more established but I’m short on funds right now. How much money can I make with my errand business before I have to file for taxes. What kind of legal forms would you suggest for me to have when I start my business. For example, I feel receipts would be helpful. The errand business model is where, I go pick up groceries or items for them from stores. I charge gas and work with them on their income or charge between $7.25-$15.00 depending on the amount of errands. Also, I plan on having a flat fee $7.25 and my customers have their stuff back by whatever time they feel appropriate by the end of the working day 5pm to 6pm.

Asked on September 17, 2011 under Business Law, Louisiana

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Personally I see nothing wrong with you placing your fliers for errand services upon people's cars that are parked in a public area in the winshield area so long as you do not damage the car. This happens all the time in California.

There may be issues if you place the information on cars that is not a public area where the charge could be a trespass claim. For example a gated area that you have to cross. But, from what you have written, if cars are on a public street or in a strip mall, you should be allowed to do what you want to do under your First Amendment Right of Freedom of Speech.


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