If a private school is closing due to embezzlement and owes the IRS, can they withhold transcripts because of an unpaid balance?

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If a private school is closing due to embezzlement and owes the IRS, can they withhold transcripts because of an unpaid balance?

The school I was sending my child was mistreating him. After several conversations with the principal we decided to pull him out. We we’re paying monthly however the principal informed us I had to pay for the remaining semester even though he did not attend the school during that month. On top of that all of a sudden we were “passed due”. This was not the first time she messed up the “books” and asked us for more money we knew we had paid. Only this time it was paid with cash so no way to prove it. Now the IRS is shutting them down for not paying taxes and she is refusing to give the transcript.

Asked on August 6, 2012 under Bankruptcy Law, Kansas

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

You need to contsct the police and the IRS as well as the state office of education and state attorney general and push hard for those transacripts.  Those agencies should be able to get those transcripts for you and you do not owe this school any more money.  If it is now being handled by the IRS, the IRS is not in the school business and may have sufficient authority to get you those transcripts. Again, contact all three agencies to ensure they all pool their resources to get you the transcripts and then make sure you keep several copies. Keep all email and other written communications you have had with her.


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