If a company gives me one price do I have to pay another?

We had a women’s retreat at a hotel in another state. We were given our final price, in writing, the day of the event. However when we checked out 2 days later they stated that we owed over $1,000 stating they made a mistake. Are we obligated to pay?

Asked on December 1, 2011 under General Practice, North Carolina

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

If you were  given a final price or firm quote, they need to honor it, unless and only to the extent that:

1) You had provided incorrect information, which could invalidate the quote;

2) The final number of guests and/or the activities they did, food purchased, etc. was different than what you had represented;

3) Similar to the above, you or your guests added charges (e.g. room service; some tour or trip through the hotel) over and above the items in the quote.

4) IF the line items in the original quote--e.g. the cost per room; the number of rooms; etc.--were all correct but they were simply totalled incorrectly, in that case, they may be able to adjust the cost for a mistake. So long as you were provided all the information necessary, in advance, to determine the correct price, they would not necessarily be bound to a typo or mathematical error.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.