What are my rights if I think that I was fired because I’m pregnant?

I worked for over a year a nursing and rehab center but was never written up until I got pregnant. I am 5 months now and got fired 2 days ago for making a simple clerical mistake transferring a phone call to the wrong person. My boss only hires young skinny girls to work for the administrative department and since he found out I was pregnant, he even made comments towards my pregnancy like “is that the hormones talking?” There have been other employees before me who had to quit because they were mistreated by him. They are willing to write an statement so that I have a stronger case. I wanted to ask you if there is a possibility of me trying to fight for our rights so this doesn’t happen again to another women?

Asked on October 9, 2015 under Employment Labor Law, Nevada

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

What you describe may be illegal employment discrimination, since the law prohibits discriminating against women due to pregnancy. It may also be a form of illegal sexual harassment, to favor female employees who are "young and skinny."  The remark your boss made would support both claims. Therefore, based on what you write, you may well have a viable legal claim against your employer.
You could speak with an employment law attorney about bringing a lawsuit. Or you could contact the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and/or your state's equal/civil rights agency or department those, not the labor department, are the agencies which enforce anti-discimination laws about filing a complaint. A private attorney will probably act faster for you, but will cost money the government agencies will, if they agree there is something to your case, act for free.


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