If I work for a company that provides us our car, is there a law or guidance on a reasonable commute to charge?

They have us provide work mileage vs personal and then we pay a tax on the personal mileage. However, they are saying that the first ride in the morning from the house/hotel to the store and the last ride from the store to the house/hotel we pay that mileage. However, sometimes that can be 200-300 miles.

Asked on October 24, 2015 under Employment Labor Law, Illinois

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

First, bear in mind that your employer does not need to reimburse or provide compensation for *any* use of your car--they are entitled to make you absorb all travel costs. Since it is voluntary on the employer's part to provide any compensation, they can decide what to pay and what not to pay.
Second, in terms of what you can take a tax benefit for (which is also used by many employers as a guide to what they would reimburse), the commute to and from work is not deductible--it is regarded as a personal expense which the employee must bear fully him/herself. So the trip from home to work, or work to home, is not deductible, and therefore very few employers provide compensation for it.


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