If Iwas put on informal probation in 1 state, how can I complete it in another state?

I was arrested for the first time for DUI in CA while I was in the process of moving TX for work. I was sentenced to 14 days in jail and attend MADD. I took time off for work and completed the jail and MADD there in CA. But now I still have 9 months of alcohol classes to do, but I was told that they need to be done in CA. I need to know if that is true and ask you if I can take these classes here in TX.

Asked on July 15, 2010 under Criminal Law, Texas

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Are you on supervised or unsupervised probation?  In other words, do you report to someone?  Generally, you can complete your probation requirements in another state but you need to apply to the court to do so.  The Probation Department must request that another jurisdiction take control of your case under an Interstate Compact.  Technically you can  not move unless the probation is accepted in the other state (here Texas). But you are in a funny situation because you were in the process of moving, correct? Were you a resident of California or Texas when you were sentenced?  This will matter.  The best thing that you can do is to find a program in Texas that qualifies and is comparable to the programs in California and have the transfer good to go before you apply to probation and the court.  This way it appears as if you are honest in your wanting to fulfill your obligations and that you are moving toward rehabilitation with a job, etc., in place.  You may want to get some legal help on the Texas end in contacting probation or just for information and the California end for putting together the paper work in the best light possible.  Good luck. 


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