If I was in an auto accident that was partially my fault and the other party’s attorney wants my insurance limits, should I allow my insurer to release them?

No citations and no police report was made. Although an officer was there. the other driver had no injuries and said he was okay. Now he has a lawyer and has asked my insurance company for my bodily injury limits and property damage limits. Should I allow them to release them.

Asked on August 5, 2015 under Accident Law, Arizona

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

What does your insurer recommend? Your insurer has much more experience in this *and* has the duty and obligation to defend you and/or indemnify (e.g. pay a settlement or damages) on your behalf, at least up to your policy limits. You should be receiving advice from your insurer as to what to do here and, unless they give you some reason to mistrust them (e.g. they are not responsive to you, are not addressing the situation, are trying to tell you that they don't cover this accident when you believe,  based on your policy and the coverage you bought, that they should), you should follow their advice. You bought insurance for situations like this, and your insurer is the professional here, not you; let them advise you as to what to do. (Note: if you feel that your insurer is not representing your interests or not honoring their policy obligations, then speak with an attorney--you may have a breach of contract claim against the insurer.)

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

What does your insurer recommend? Your insurer has much more experience in this *and* has the duty and obligation to defend you and/or indemnify (e.g. pay a settlement or damages) on your behalf, at least up to your policy limits. You should be receiving advice from your insurer as to what to do here and, unless they give you some reason to mistrust them (e.g. they are not responsive to you, are not addressing the situation, are trying to tell you that they don't cover this accident when you believe,  based on your policy and the coverage you bought, that they should), you should follow their advice. You bought insurance for situations like this, and your insurer is the professional here, not you; let them advise you as to what to do. (Note: if you feel that your insurer is not representing your interests or not honoring their policy obligations, then speak with an attorney--you may have a breach of contract claim against the insurer.)


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