If I was arrested for a DUI last month and will have my license suspended, what the laws are regarding other forms of transportation?

Obviously motorcycles, scooters, etc that require a CA drivers license are out of the question. Would I be able to ride a go-ped or motorized bicycle, which do not require an sort of license to operate, with my suspended license? I’m under the impression that If I don’t need a license to ride it, it should be okay. Is this true or because my license is suspended I can’t ride/drive anything with a motor. If this is the case does that mean I can’t even drive a golf cart when I go golfing? I understand I can get a DUI on a bicycle/ golf cart, etc. But can a operate one sober?

Asked on August 19, 2011 California

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If you were arrested last month for driving under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance, under California law your driving privileges will be suspended by Caifornia's Department of Motor Vehicles. However, you can make an application with this entity to have driving privileges to and from work. This might be an option for you.

Under Calfornia law, you cannot operate a motorized vehicle on a public street requiring a driver's license for its operation if your driver's license is suspended. A bicycle, a bicycle with an electric motor, skateboard, or a scooter without a motor are allowed for transportation in your circumstances.

For clarification of your question on your allowed mode of transportation you need to contact California's Department of Motor Vehicles on the subject.

Good luck.


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