I was a property insurance adjuster, but I left resigned from the company for which I worked…

I have since received a message from an attorney representing the insurance company my former employer asking that I contact him regarding a deposition in a bad faith lawsuit for a claim that I handled while I was employed with the company. Since I no longer work for the company, I do not want to be involved in this matter. Am I required by law to contact them and give a deposition? Please let me know. Like I said, I do not want to be involved in this matter. I am in the process of changing careers, as I no longer want to work in the insurance claims industry. Thank you

Asked on December 21, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 1 year ago | Contributor

If you have been subpenoaed, then that is a court order to appear, so you must go. If you do not, legal action can be taken against. That having been said, absent actually being formally subpenoaed, you do not have to attend the deposition. All of the foregoing holds true whether or not you are still employed by the employer in question.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 1 year ago | Contributor

If you are subpoenaed, you'd have to provide the deposition; you do not need to do so if simply asked or requested, but a subpoena is compulsory legal process--the equivalent of a court order--and you would have to obey it. That you do not work for this employer or even in the industry anymore is irrelevant.


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