What to do about a medical bill for an unnecessary procedure?

I recently made a trip to the ER and upon arrival I told the intake nurse, attending nurse and doctor that I thought I had a complication from an ovarian cyst that I get every other month. I asked them to maybe just do an ultrasound to look at it because it was hurting badly and I was afraid it was causing damage. Instead, the doctor told me I may have kidney stones and they should do a CT scan instead. I agreed, as I didn’t know any better and feared they may be right. Of course it came back negative and they never diagnosed anything though my obgyn determined I was likely correct. So, I then received the $4400 CT scan bill and felt it was ridiculous charge for something I didn’t need. How can I fight this bill?

Asked on September 16, 2013 under Malpractice Law, Colorado

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 7 years ago | Contributor

You can't fight it.

1) You agreed to the procedure; that agreement obligates you to pay for it.

2) It may be that the procedure turned out to be unnecessary, but that does not make it malpractice; it was reasonable for the doctor to order it, given your symptoms, rather than rely on what you, a layperson, thought. It is not malpractice to order tests that seem indicated by symptoms.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 7 years ago | Contributor

You can't fight it.

1) You agreed to the procedure; that agreement obligates you to pay for it.

2) It may be that the procedure turned out to be unnecessary, but that does not make it malpractice; it was reasonable for the doctor to order it, given your symptoms, rather than rely on what you, a layperson, thought. It is not malpractice to order tests that seem indicated by symptoms.


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