I received a summons for two automotive infractions to pay a fine. I plan to argue at least one of the infractions, can I do so at that time?

I received an infraction for an Improper Turn violation (14-242), along with an Insufficient Insurance (14-2136) infraction. At that date, I had an insurance card with me, but the date was expired even though my insurance was active (the policy number was valid). Could I bring my insurance card to indicate that my card coverage was active while pleading guilty to the other charge and paying the fine? Or does any dispute require a formal court setting with the undersigned officer present, etc?

Asked on July 6, 2009 under Criminal Law, Connecticut

Answers:

J.M.A., Member in Good Standing of the Connecticut Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

I am a lawyer in CT and practice in this area of the law.  I defend people in motor vehicle court all the time.  You need to bring the current insurance card and show that you had sufficient insurance if you did.  as for the improper turn, you need to ask if you can pay some charitable donation and you should apologize for making the turn.  If you were able to afford a lawyer I suggest you do that for $500 as the amount of money your insurance will go up if you plead to any of these tickets (even if the fine is reduced) is well worth the money that you will be saving over time. You can make these arguments on the court date.  If you would like to ask another question before the court date direct your question to JMA.


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