If I plead guilty to a misdemeanor assault charge and have had it expunged but it still shows up when I am fingerprinted, is there anything I can do about it?

I want go to nursing school.

Asked on July 28, 2014 under Criminal Law, Ohio

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 6 years ago | Contributor

Did you also expunge the arrest and get back the fingerprinted cards? People often forget that the arrest and conviction show up separately on a background check.  And you should always run one on yourself after expungement to be sure it is gone.  But also understand that certain agencies - especially law enforcement and licensing agencies - can see information on arrests and convictions, even those sealed and expunged.  But do not fret because I understand that in Ohio you can still become a licensed nurse even with a criminal record so long as the crime is not one of the following: aggravated murder, murder, voluntary manslaughter, felonious assault, kidnapping, rape, sexual batter, aggravated robbery, aggravated burglary, gross sexual imposition and aggravated arson.  You need to be up front with the nursing school at the time of admission.  Here is a link.  Good luck.

http://legalcounseltoprofessionals.wordpress.com/2012/08/20/you-can-be-licensed-as-a-nurse-in-ohio-with-a-criminal-history-depending-on-the-crime/


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