If I need to change my legal name for religious reasons, is there a way to do this and still satisfy the requirements of a trust?

I am the recipient of an annuity via a trust left me by my father. I need to change my legal name for religious reasons but this would complicate things because it is stated that the funds must be deposited directly to an account in my name. I have long since lost the paperwork to the trust as well as lost contact with the one in charge of the trust. It has been set up so that checks are automatically sent to my bank. Is there any simple solution to this? Maybe a legal alias or DBA name?

Asked on November 27, 2011 under Estate Planning, Tennessee

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

When you get your official name change per a court order, you will simply need to submit a copy of the certified order changing your name from what it is currently to what it will be with all of your financial institutions so that there will be a record as to your current name and soon to be future name showing that you are the same person.

I would personally speak with the manager of your bank to go over what you plan and doing and sign all paper work needed so that there will be no interruption in your receipt of the trust monies that you periodically receive. Keep all documents that you sign for future need.


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