I have a contract on a house, tax roll says it includes 2 lots.There is a third lot that the previous owners owned(before forclosure). we are in texas

2 deeds:2 lots with house and then the other lot. problem is aerobic sprinklers are on 3rd(not included lot)but there is an affidavit that is notarized stating all 3 lots are to be sold as one and wife signed. also permit for septic shows all 3 lots. bank that forclosed on them is current owner of that one lot they have the street wrong but shows the same deed info that the other two lots show who are owned and being sold to us by a trustee of the that bank. what are our rights as possible new owners with that 3rd lot. can the bank change their mind and add the lot and ask for more money.

Asked on June 10, 2009 under Real Estate Law, Texas

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

This is a very tangled-up situation.  You need a good lawyer to untangle it for you, and one place to locate a qualified attorney near you is our website, http://attorneypages.com

A lot is going to depend on how all the factual confusion I see here gets resolved, it's going to depend on how the one lot got separated from the other two.

Without knowing more, I'd think you would want to add the third lot to the two you are buying, as the full deal would be worth quite a bit more.


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