If I have a car that belonged to my mother-in-law who passed away over 1 1/2 years ago, what can I legally do with it?

The car was titled in her name. She did not have a Will. Surviving family members have not claimed the car. The vehicle has been in the same spot in drive way since the date indicated above. It has never moved.

Asked on September 8, 2011 under Estate Planning, Louisiana

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You have the following options concerning your deceased mother-in-law's car as to its disposal:

1. sell it to a third party via written bill of sale advising the buyer that it will be his or her obligation to get registered title to it into his or her name;

2. donate it to a charitable organization. However the amount of the donation for tax purposes will be its ultimate sales price;

3. sell it to a scrap yard;

4. use it as an alternate vehicle;

5. contact your local department of motor vehicles regarding the easiest way to transfer registered ownership of it to you or someone else. Going through the time and expense of a probate for some vehicle to transfer title to it does not make much economic sense if it is not worth much.

Good luck.

 


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