What to do about a warrant for failure to complete probation?

I got a year probation, ** hours community service, 2 DWI classes and I have 15-20 hours left for community service and I did not finish 1 class. I get off in a month and they issued a warrant for my arrest. It was my 1st DWI.

Asked on August 5, 2015 under Criminal Law, Texas

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

Right now... your main option is to turn yourself in and deal with the situation at court.  However, some probation officers will let you come in and talk about the situation. If you can convince your probation officer to extend your probation for three months to give you time to finish the class and the community service, then they may be inclined to ask the DA's office to pull the warrant-- or to release you on a PR bond--- so that you can finish your required tasks.  Saying "hey, I promise to get it done" will not be very persuasive.  If you're going to pitch this idea, have a plan.  For example, lay out who will help you with transportation or that you've got approval to take work for the next four weekends.  Basically, you need to show the probation officer that this is a priority for you.

If the probation office isn't willing to go along, then you need to hire an attorney (or get a court appointed one after you are arrested) to pitch the plan to the prosecutor on your behalf.  At the end of the day, the prosecutor will trump the probation officer.

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

Right now... your main option is to turn yourself in and deal with the situation at court.  However, some probation officers will let you come in and talk about the situation. If you can convince your probation officer to extend your probation for three months to give you time to finish the class and the community service, then they may be inclined to ask the DA's office to pull the warrant-- or to release you on a PR bond--- so that you can finish your required tasks.  Saying "hey, I promise to get it done" will not be very persuasive.  If you're going to pitch this idea, have a plan.  For example, lay out who will help you with transportation or that you've got approval to take work for the next four weekends.  Basically, you need to show the probation officer that this is a priority for you.

If the probation office isn't willing to go along, then you need to hire an attorney (or get a court appointed one after you are arrested) to pitch the plan to the prosecutor on your behalf.  At the end of the day, the prosecutor will trump the probation officer.


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