If I drive a company owned vehicle and was pulled over and ticked for failure to affix the registration tag, who is responsible for the fines?

The sticker was on both sides but it had just partially warn off partially on the front plate; you can see some of that tag. Who is responsible for affixing a tag, the company or me? Also, I believe that the law says its sticker has to be constructed to make it permanent. It obviously wasn’t constructed to their specs.

Asked on April 16, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Nebraska

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Generally, the person or business to whom the vehicle is registered is responsible for making sure any tags, etc. are present and properly affixed; a person driving another's vehicle is not responsible for what the vehicle's owner does or does not do in this regard, because it is not under their control. When you appear for the court date on the ticket, bring the ownership to the prosecutor's attention and ideally bring paperwork showing the company owns the vehicle--alternately, if there are no "points" involved, just a fine, if your company will pay the fine for you, you should be able to just pay it online or mail it in and not appear for court; but if the company doesn't pay it upfront (e.g. on their check or credit card) but instead wants you to pay and will then reimburse you, get their agreement to do so in writing.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.