I am worried about my company giving out more of my information.

My company already gave my home phone number to a college without my permission, now they are telling us we have to have our picture taken. Do I have to let them take my picture?

Asked on June 10, 2009 under Employment Labor Law, Massachusetts

Answers:

J.V., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

in general the answer is yes as long as they want it for a legitimate reason such as photo id cards or for a scanner to show your picture. A company is entitled to this type of information as what we look like is not private information. Furthermore the only real reason this would be a problem was if a persons religious beliefs for example prohibited their picture being taken.

I assume this type of problem doesn't exist for you and as such would advise to just comply. However if there is more to this than you may want to contact a local attorney who specializes in this area of law. they can hear you out than advise as to what they would do in this situation and than you can proceed from there.

J.V., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

in general the answer is yes as long as they want it for a legitimate reason such as photo id cards or for a scanner to show your picture. A company is entitled to this type of information as what we look like is not private information. Furthermore the only real reason this would be a problem was if a persons religious beliefs for example prohibited their picture being taken.

I assume this type of problem doesn't exist for you and as such would advise to just comply. However if there is more to this than you may want to contact a local attorney who specializes in this area of law. they can hear you out than advise as to what they would do in this situation and than you can proceed from there.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.