i am legal married in my country, Philippines and we work my togerther my wife in Saipan, Northern Marianas Island, USA territory, my wife is planing

to devorce me here in saipan, we work her as a contrac worker, in my country no devorce law, can my wife aply devorce her?can i tell to the court that our married is ing my country, how if i dont like to sign the devore papers? what can i do i dont like to devorce my wife? can i complain to the court that this our problem is the philippine court, juresdiction, not her because we married in our country

Asked on May 23, 2009 under Family Law

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

Where people from different countries get married, and one or both then choose to reside in another country, the procedures for divorce can become significantly more complicated.  Although most countries make divorce possible, the form of settlement or agreement following divorce may be very different depending on where the divorce takes place.  In some countries there may be a bias towards the man regarding property settlements, and in others there may be a bias towards the woman, both concerning property, and also custody of any children.  One or both parties may seek to divorce in a country which has jurisdiction over them.  Normally there will be a residence requirement in the country in which the divorce takes place.

You need to speak to an attorney that practices law in the country where you reside.  He can best advise you of you rights.


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