What to do if I am kept from seeing my kids even though I am made to pay child support?

I am unable to get legal aid because of the channels my legally separated wife went through. She refuses to let me see them since they were born and I have not had enough money to pay a lawyer even though I need one because I believe that the children are in some unsafe conditions, I have tried many times in the past with calling the cops and so on an so forth. She calls the cops on me if I even come to the house or try to see them at all. Also, I believe that she had an in with the judge and that the ruling was very unjust and all in their favor. Additionally, one of the kids are likely not mine but I have not really had a chance to get a DNA test.

Asked on September 21, 2012 under Family Law, Kentucky

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

You need a lawyer. You need a lawyer. You need to go to legal aid, the state bar, parent groups, anything of this sort and get a lawyer. You need to force a DNA test on all of these kids and that will help determine to whom you are indebited. You can then seek amendments to the support order and visitation because she is in contempt. She cannot prevent you from seeing these children. If you have legal documentation or evidence showing the affair between the judge and your ex, go to the state bar and show what occurred and go to the chief judge and show what has occurred and seek recourse. Be vigilant. Many state bars have pro bono attorneys and programs.


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