What to do if I am a renter with housing authority and the lease says that I am not able to put locks on any of my doors?

I live in a very unsafe area and I am under housing authority, they refuse to make things safe and I have been broken into, I have a clause under my lease that states that I am not able without there written consent able to put locks on the doors, I did not know this and put locks on my closet doors. The are refusing to take the keys, I asked for double sided locks due to being on the first floor with single pane glass windows, what I do if the landlord refuses to make things safe and I cant afford to move. Can they evict me based upon violating the lease if it’s this unsafe?

Asked on August 2, 2012 under Real Estate Law, California

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

A housing authority tenant can be evicted for violating the terms of his or her lease. The landlord has the right to prohibit the tenant from putting his or her own locks on doors, windows, etc.--that is a legal lease provision. So long as there is a lock on your front door; some security on the building's front door (e.g. it's locked and you need a key to get in or to be buzzed in by a tenant), and your windows can be shut so they cannot be opened from the outside without forcing them or breaking them, the landlord is most likely complying with its obligations in regard to security and you would not have any recourse.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

A housing authority tenant can be evicted for violating the terms of his or her lease. The landlord has the right to prohibit the tenant from putting his or her own locks on doors, windows, etc.--that is a legal lease provision. So long as there is a lock on your front door; some security on the building's front door (e.g. it's locked and you need a key to get in or to be buzzed in by a tenant), and your windows can be shut so they cannot be opened from the outside without forcing them or breaking them, the landlord is most likely complying with its obligations in regard to security and you would not have any recourse.


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