I am a 16 year old juvenile and i have been placed on 1 year of probation for theft. I will begin probation in about 2 weeks.

But I HAVE to leave the country in a month and a half for 2 months. The reason is i have a green card and im a citizen of Russia, and I will be turning 17 in august which means I will have to be in the draft in November, and if Im not then I will be a dodger and cant come back to the country untill I am 27. I also have to change my passport/picture once I turn 17. I also have all my family in russia, including a sick single grandmother, and a 4 year old little brother. I understand that i really screwed up, but I have to go. Would a PO let me do that, and what can i do to persuade him? Thanks.

Asked on May 18, 2009 under Criminal Law, New Jersey

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

I'd suggest that you get in touch with the Russian consulate, and get a letter from them confirming what your legal obligations are to Russia, so that you don't have to ask your probation officer to simply take your word for that part of your situation, because I doubt that would happen.  I doubt that your family situation will make any difference in this.

You might also want to talk to a criminal defense attorney.  One place you can look for a qualified lawyer is our website, http://attorneypages.com


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