What to do if my husband may or may not be married to someone else?

I understand that my husband is still married to someone else in another state. The woman is apparently working to finalize the divorce. I didn’t know any of this. The problem is when he and the woman got married, he was in the process of divorcing yet another woman, his 2nd wife, in the same state. His divorce wasn’t finalized until 5 years ago yet he married the 3rd woman 2 years before that (I’m not sure if he and his first wife were divorced before he married his second wife). I’m trying to figure out if the marriage between he and the 3rd wife is valid. I am the 4th wife. I am also trying to find out if my marriage is valid. If I wanted to divorce him, do I need to go through the divorce stage or is my marriage even valid?

Asked on May 23, 2016 under Family Law, Massachusetts

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

I'll just address your marital situation. Since your husband was already married when he "married" you, your union was not legal. This means that your "marriage" it is null and void. In other words, it's as though you were never married. Accordingly, you need not file for divorce. However, to clarify your legal postion, you should consider filing for an annullment. For further information, you can contact a local divorce attorney and consult with them directly about your situation.


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