How to get jurisdiction for small claims court case changed?

I’m the plaintiff in a breach of contract small claims case. It went in front of a magistrate this past week. It will be continued in 2-3 weeks since she required me to transcribe a phone conversation because it was too long to listen to. I mentioned this to a friend and he pointed out that as my business is no longer in that city, and I’d moved it shortly before the breach of contract occurred, that I’d filed in the wrong jurisdiction and need to have it changed. The court and told me to get an attorney or research my state’s code, which I did, but found nothing conclusive.

Asked on October 14, 2011 under Business Law, Ohio

Answers:

Mark E. Esq. / GODBEY LAW

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Most of the time, suits are filed in the jurisdiction where the defendant resides. After that, possibly where the contract was entered into.  As far as trascribing an audio tape, most court reporting agencies will have someone that can do this service.  If you need further assistance, you can email me directly at mark@godbeylaw.com

Mark E. Esq. / GODBEY & ASSOCIATES: ATTORNEYS AT LAW

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Most of the time, suits are filed in the jurisdiction where the defendant resides. After that, possibly where the contract was entered into.  As far as trascribing an audio tape, most court reporting agencies will have someone that can do this service.  If you need further assistance, you can email me directly at mark@godbeylaw.com


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