How soon after your arrested for a DUI will it show up on a background check?

I just recieved an employment offer for a veterinary receptionist position where they would like to perform a background check. Four days before the first day I was arrested for a second DUI violating the terms of my probation. They are aware of the previous DUI. How long will it take to show up on a background check if I have not yet been convicted?

Asked on June 8, 2009 under Criminal Law, California

Answers:

M.S., Member, Connecticut Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

Your question really depends on what kind of background check your employer conducts.  Some employers do background checks that cover pending cases, arrest records, as well as convictions.  Other employers conduct background checks that only cover convictions.  Obviously, in your case, if your employer limits its background check to convictions, then the amount of time that it will take to show up on your background check will be contingent on the amount of time it takes for you to be convicted (if you are in fact convicted) of your new charges.  If, however, your employer's background checks do cover arrests and pending cases, there is really no exact science to determine when exactly the information will appear, because it is too contingent on how the background checks are conducted.  If your employer uses a service to conduct the checks, it is possible there will be some delay between the date of the arrest and the date that it shows up on your record, due to the fact that the services provide information that they purchase, which needs to updated periodically.  If, however, your employer were to personally call the court system, it is possible that they would be able to find out about your case as soon as it is docketed due to the fact that it is technically part of the public record.


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