How possible is it to get out of a speeding ticket?

I was just entering a construction zone on a highway and I was following a dump truck. It was going as fast, if not faster, than I was. Then as I looked to the side of the road, I saw a motorcycle cop with a radar gun, and he pulled me over. I asked him if he was sure that he had gunned me and not the truck, since I couldn’t see him until I was about to pass him. He said that he had gotten me, and that the truck very well could have been speeding but he had other things going on and wasn’t concerned. What can I do to get out of this?

Asked on October 11, 2011 under General Practice, Wisconsin

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

It's unlikely you can "get out of" the ticket--there  is no law that says you may go as fast as other traffic, and no requirement that the police pull over everyone that speeds; so long as they are not discriminating on some improper basis (e.g. due to race), the police can choose to pull ove this person but not that one. It is also very difficult to challenge the accuracy of the radar gun--that has been litigated many, many times, and the police and radar gun almost always win. You best bet, if you have an otherwise clean record, is to see if you can't the offense bargained down to a lesser one; to do that, your best bet is to hire a local attorney who has experience handling traffic tickets and who knows all the "players" (e.g. the prosecutor, the judge, etc.). Good luck.


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